KingsProgressTextVersion

This is an AutoGeneratedTextVersion of KingsProgress

The King's Progress 
A game for the piecepack by Phillip Lerche 
Version 1.0, December 27, 2002 
2-4 Players (best with 3 or 4), 20-40 minutes 
Copyright ©2002 by Phillip Lerche 

Equipment to play 
1 piecepack (see http://www.piecepack.org) 
Paper and pencil for scoring at the end of the game 

Introduction 
Medieval Kings would often visit the various cities of their kingdoms in order to 
enforce tax collection and discourage thoughts of rebellion and treason. This was 
known as a Progress. In this game each player acts as a King's chancellor 
overseeing the King's Progress throughout the cities of the kingdom. 

The aim is to collect the most tax at the end of the game by steering your own 
King through the richest cities with the highest investments while scheming to 
force the Kings of your opponents to travel through poor cities with low 
investments. 

Setup 
Each player takes one set of components of a specific suit. After this initial 
selection the suits play no further role in the game. 

The pawns represent the Kings. Tiles represent the cities the kings will potentially 
visit on their progresses and are used to build a kingdom of 6 cities for each 
player. Coins represent the secret investments the chancellors make in the 
various cities. The dice represent the number of veto powers the chancellors 
have left. The numeric values of the tiles, coins and dice range from 0-5 (null = 0, 
Ace = 1). 

Place the Kings in the center of the table. Each player then sets his or her veto 
die on the table with the number 5 showing (representing 5 vetoes available). 
Coins and tiles are placed in front of each player forming a reserve. Coins and 
tiles in the reserve are kept face-down (or in any way that the numeric values are 
hidden from the other players). A player may look at the values of the coins and 
tiles in his or her own reserve at any time during the game. 

Game play 
The game is played in 6 rounds consisting of 5 phases per round. The oldest 
player is the first chancellor in round 1, and play proceeds clockwise around the 
table. At the end of a round, the player to the left of the current first chancellor 
becomes the new first chancellor and a new round begins. At the end of 6 rounds 
all the tiles and coins will have been placed in the various kingdoms. Scoring 
then occurs. 


Each round consists of 5 phases: 

The city phase. Starting with the first chancellor and passing to the left, each 
player in turn must place one of his or her city tiles face-up in any kingdom (the 
player's or an opponent's) between the king and the respective player. The tile 
must be placed such that it is 1 tile closer to the player. If a tile has already been 
placed in a kingdom in this phase that kingdom may not be expanded further until 
the next round. After the first city phase of a 4-player game the center of the play 
area looks like this: 








City tile 









City tile 
Kings 
City tile 









City tile 





City veto phase. Starting with the first chancellor and passing to the left, each 
player in turn may, if they wish, veto any city tile placed in his or her own 
kingdom (i.e. a city placed in this round or a previous round). A city with a King 
present may not be vetoed. If a player chooses to veto a city, he or she replaces 
that city with a different tile played face-up from his or her reserve without looking 
at the coin on the tile (if one is present). The replaced tile is then added to the 
player's reserve (and is now hidden from opponents). This uses one veto, and 
the player's veto die is turned to show the next lower number. Once the veto die 
shows zero that player must pass during subsequent veto rounds. There is no 
city veto phase in the last round. 

Investment phase. Starting with the player to the left of the first chancellor, then 
passing to the left, each player in turn must invest in a city. Each player does so 
by placing one of his or her coins face-down on an available city tile in any 
kingdom that does not have a coin on it. There may only ever be 1 coin per city 
tile. 



Investment veto phase. Starting with the player to the left of the first chancellor 
and passing to the left, each player in turn may veto any investment in his or her 
own kingdom. An investment in a city with a King present may not be vetoed. If 
the player chooses to veto an investment he or she takes the coin and looks at it, 
then replaces it with a coin from his or her reserve. The replaced coin is then 
added to the reserve. This uses one veto, and the veto die is turned to the next 
lower number. Once the veto die shows zero that player must pass during 
subsequent veto rounds. There is no investment veto phase in the last round. 

King's Progress. On the first turn each player moves his or her King onto the 
single city of his or her own kingdom. From the second turn onwards, each player 
either moves his or her king one city further in the kingdom following the same 
path as city placement, or vetoes the King's Progress. The King may never move 
backwards. If the King is moved the player may then secretly examine the coin 
on the city the King is in. If the King's Progress is vetoed the King does not move, 
the coin on the next city is not examined, and the number of vetoes available is 
decreased by 1. 

After 6 rounds all the tiles and coins will have been placed in the kingdoms and 
scoring commences. A completed 4-player game will have this shape (each tile 
will have a face-down coin on it): 

Scoring 
All the coins are now turned face-up. Each city is scored as follows: city score = 
tile value x coin value. If the King is present in a city then the score for that city is 
doubled. The scores of the 6 cities are added together for the kingdom score. 
The value that is showing on the veto die is then added to the score ­ this is the 
total amount of tax collected on the King's Progress. 

The player with the highest score wins. If there is a tie then the player with the 
highest individual city score wins. If still tied, the highest valued city with the king 

present determines the winner. If the game is still tied, the player with the most 
vetoes left wins. Otherwise the game is declared a draw. 

Scoring example for one player: 


Tile: 2 
Coin: 0 
City score: 0 


Tile: 1 
Coin: 2 
City score: 2 


Tile: 3 
Coin: 2 
City score: 6 


Tile: 5 
Coin: 2 
City score: 10 

KING 
Tile: 3 
Coin: 4 
City score: 12 
12 x 2 = 24 

Tile: 3 
Coin: 5 
City score: 15 


Kingdom scores: 
0 + 2 + 6 + 10 + 24 + 15 = 57 
Veto die showing: 2 
Final Score: kingdom (57) + unused veto (2) = King's Progress of 59 tax 
collected 

Design note: 

In a 2- or 3-player game each player will have been first chancellor an equal 
number of times in one game. In order to give all players an opportunity to be first 
chancellor in a 4-player game, two games should be played and the scores 

totaled. City scores and King placement in the second game are used to break 
any ties.